Category Archives: General

Bahrain Airport Company Conducts Successful Hazard Material Accident Exercise

Bahrain Airport

In line with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), Bahrain Airport Company (BAC), the operator and managing body of Bahrain International Airport (BIA), conducted a Hazard Material “Chemical Liquid” Accident Exercise on the 24th of April. The participants involved in the activity were , Ministry of Interior Operations Directorate, Civil Defense & Fire Services, Airport Police, Airport Customs, BAC Airport Rescue & Firefighting Services, BAC security, BAC Airside Operations, BAC Corporate Communications, BAC Health, Safety & Environment, King Hamad University Hospital and Bahrain Airport Services (BAS). The purpose of a radioactive accident exercise is to ensure the adequacy of the plan to cope with different types of accident/incident scenarios that may occur at Bahrain International Airport.

UNWTO: No Reason to Be Afraid to Travel to Madagascar, Mauritius and Seychelles

The Minister of Tourism of Madagascar, Roland Ratsiraka, the Minister of Tourism of Mauritius, Anil Kumarsingh Gayan, SC and the Minister for Tourism, Civil Aviation, Ports and Marine of the Seychelles, Maurice Loustau-Lalanne met at the sidelines of the World Travel Market in London to express a common message of confidence on the measures being taken by Madagascar to overcome the plague outbreak.meeting was convened and chaired by UNWTO

The meeting was convened and chaired by UNWTO Secretary-General, Taleb Rifai, in the presence of the Permanent Secretary of Kenya Mrs. Fatuma HirsiI Mohamed, representing the chair of the UNWTO Commission for Africa, Minister Najib Balala.

Ministers recalled that all countries are taking the measures recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), and expressed their confidence that these are going on the right direction.

UNWTO Secretary-General recalled that WHO does not recommend any travel bans on Madagascar and that “based on the available information to date, the risk of international spread of plague appears very low”.

 

News source: atn.aero

World’s Busiest International Passenger Routes Revealed

 

air passenger routes map

As 275 airlines gather in Barcelona over the coming days for World Routes 2017, including the world’s top ten carriers by capacity, Routesonline can reveal the 20 busiest non-stop international passenger routes on earth.

With an average of 80 flights per day – that’s one every 18 minutes – Hong Kong (HKG) – Taipei Taiwan Taoyuan (TPE) was the busiest during July 2017, the research has found.

A total of 451,801 passengers travelled the 802km between the densely-populated autonomous territory of Hong Kong and Taipei, the capital of Taiwan. The July total was 4.6 percent higher than June and 129,313 more passengers than the second busiest international route on earth, Jakarta Soekarno-Hatta (CGK) – Singapore Changi (SIN).

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NHS Care Pathway to Improve Treatment of Pilots and Crew

NHS sign

The British Airline Pilots’ Association has worked with clinical toxicologists at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, the Royal College of General Practitioners, the Civil Aviation Authority, easyJet and academia to create a care pathway for patients presenting with possible cabin air-related symptoms, which can include itching or soreness of the eyes, nasal discharge, sore throat or coughing.

In recent years, concerns have been raised about possible long-term adverse health effects of exposure to contaminants in cabin air.

BALPA says it’s important to have a clear pathway in place. As the problem is complex, some cases may require medical specialists to assess them correctly.

BALPA Head of Flight Safety, Dr Rob Hunter, said:

“Care pathways are approved by authoritative medical bodies and represent the best use of NHS resources.

“Although the vast majority of fume events do not lead to crew and passengers requiring treatment, we want to ensure the proper processes are put in place for those who do.

“Working with our partners we feel this new pathway will enable doctors to take the appropriate steps to ensure the affected person gets the best treatment.

“We believe until now, there has been a lot of confusing information and pilots have been unsure as to who they should see if they have persisting symptoms.

“BALPA hopes that the work we’ve done in this area will give pilots a clearer understanding of who is best to treat them.

“We also hope that use of the pathway will facilitate further research, which would be led by the centre of excellence at the Clinical Toxicology Unit of Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital, in understanding the possible health effects of contaminated cabin air.”

 

News source: atn.aero

HKIA Holds Multi-Scenario Field Exercise for Emergency Incidents

view of Hong Kong International Airport

Airport Authority Hong Kong (AA) arranged a multi-scenario field exercise at the non-restricted area of Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) during morning of May 19, giving various related parties the opportunity to review and refresh their contingency measures in case of an emergency incident at the airport.

The first scenario simulated a suspect who was noticed loitering and acting suspiciously at the Meeters & Greeters Hall in Terminal 1, near the ticketing counters of the Airport Express (AEL). MTR Corporation (MTR) staff reported the situation to the AA, which accordingly contacted Police and Aviation Security Company Limited (AVSECO). Following emergency response procedures, police subdued the suspect while passengers were directed to safe areas.

In another scenario testing emergency response measures to a fire and hostage situation in the AEL area, a simulated suspect ran to the AEL platform after loitering at the Meeters & Greeters Hall. He then boarded a train and set fire with a bottle of inflammable liquid on his hand, before returning to the platform with a hostage held at knifepoint. As part of the scenario, the suspect then pushed the hostage away and brandished his knife at other passengers on the platform. The MTR responded by guiding members of the public to safe areas. Police arrived upon the scene immediately and subdued the suspect at the AEL platform, while FSD extinguished the fire and medical teams attended to the injured. The exercise included simulated injuries to more than 10 passengers, who were diverted to the Assembly Point for medical treatment.

The exercise was jointly organised by the AA with the Airport Security Unit of the Hong Kong Police Force (HKP), Fire Services Department (FSD), MTR, AVSECO and other related medical teams – aiming to test relevant response procedures and plans in the event of an emergency situation, as well as to strengthen communications between parties and verify the readiness of equipment and facilities.

Each year HKIA conducts more than 100 drills, exercises and training seminars covering a number of operational disruption and emergency response scenarios, including severe weather, system failure, equipment malfunctions, public health incidents and security issues. Participants in this field exercise included the following organisations: (in alphabetical order)

• Aviation Security Company Limited
• Civil Aid Service
• Fire Services Department
• Hong Kong Police Force
• MTR
• Port Health Office
• Raffles Medical Group

 

News source: atn.aero

Who Needs an Air Ambulance?

air ambulance prepared for flight
We all hope that we never experience a trauma or medical emergency that requires treatment. Nobody ever thinks they’ll be forced to deal with a critical medical condition that requires extensive medical treatment and care. Although we never want to be in such a circumstance, it is important to be informed about such issues. When patients need medical attention during transport, the method of travel involves an ambulance, but in specific cases, standard medical transportation is not enough. An air ambulance may be what the doctor ordered.
 
What medical conditions and critical situations call for the use of an air ambulance? Each case is different based on the specific medical needs of the patient. There is no exact rule of thumb, but some basic guidelines do exist to determine which patients need the use of an air ambulance.
 
If the patient’s doctor feels that the patient need not travel by air with conventional airlines due to their specific medical needs, the doctor will order travel by an air ambulance. Many companies and organizations exist to transport patients in this way. Each company has their own specific requirements for staff on board the flight. Special medical circumstances may call for specific medical teams to go with the patient.
 
Here are some examples of medical conditions that may state a need to travel by air ambulance:
 
  • Patients suffering from respiratory conditions that need ventilators
  • trauma patients
  • patients with neurological conditions that need intra cranial monitoring
  • IABP patients that need balloon pumps
  • patients with multiple IV drips
  • transplant patients
  • obstetric patients requiring intensive care
  • NICU patients
 
The patients that need continuous medical monitoring and the use of specialized medical equipment are excellent candidates for travel by air ambulance. There is no plausible way for a patient with severe medical conditions to travel by conventional methods while achieving comfort and appropriate medical care.
 
When time is of the essence, standard flights would not be speedy enough to transport a patient to their destination. Also, it is impossible to board a conventional flight with an entire medical staff and equipment. For this reason, doctors and patients choose to travel by air ambulance.
 
An air ambulance may be a helicopter,
But it also can include planes such as turboprops and jets.
 
The type of aircraft used should be determined by the patients needs, as well as, by the distance traveled. For example, a patient should typically be transported by a jet when they require air ambulance transportation for distances greater than 500 miles. This is due to the time traveled, necessary stops to refuel small planes, the patient’s comfort and stress level.
 
Traveling by air ambulance may not be an experience that you want to add to your to-do list, but it may be necessary in the future. Patients who need constant medical attention, the use of specific medical equipment, or have numerous IV drips may require the use of such services. Should the doctor feel that this specialized service is beneficial, you will be glad that the air ambulance services are available.